Book Review | Daisy on the Outer Line – Ross Sayers

Cranachan Publishing


After selfish student Daisy makes a scene at her stepdad’s funeral, she drunkenly falls asleep on the Glasgow subway and wakes to find she has travelled back in time. And to make matters worse, she’s in someone else’s body.

To make amends for her behaviour, she must save a life—but she doesn’t know who, how, or where to begin. She’ll have to find out fast if she wants to make it back to her old life and avoid being trapped in the wrong timeline forever.


First of all, Daisy on the Outer Line is hilarious. I was snorting after about ten pages, and it takes a lot for a book to actually evoke a physical reaction in me. Genuinely witty writing with the kind of typical Scottish observational comedy that makes me cackle. It’s written in Scots as well, which I absolutely love – it was like sitting down with one of my pals, which was a tonic given the current situation.

Daisy should be incredibly unlikable, but her flaws are so deeply human and relatable that you’re cringing alongside her, and quite often you just want to give her a cuddle. There’s no shying away from the fact that she’s selfish and self-absorbed at times, but she’s equally fragile and warm and funny. There’s just something about her that’s hits different from the usual “sad girl puts up a front” character, and she’s an absolute treat to follow.

It’s a time travel book with a touch of the spiritual and a contemporary YA heart, and knew it was going to be a five-star read after the first couple of chapters. I was right. Congratulations, Ross, you’ve done it again.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Six For Sunday | Books From My Childhood

Six for Sunday is a weekly book meme run by Steph at A Little but a Lot, and this week it’s books from my childhood! I’ve picked a selection that stick out in my memory.

I’m deliberately choosing not to mention my childhood-defining book because it’s written by That Author, and while it probably shaped me and fundamentally affected me more than any other book or series, I’m not giving it clout. Trans rights are human rights.

Dogger – Shirley Hughes

Yes this is a real book. It’s got a happy ending but for any child with a favourite teddy, it’s a roller coaster.

(My mum used to work in a nursery and a few years ago it turned out she’d never heard of this book. She thought I was making it up. On a trip to Waterstones I discovered it and pulled it out of the shelf while triumphantly announcing DOGGER, which I shortly realised afterwards was perhaps not the best idea in the middle of a shop.

Old Bear Stories – Jane Hissey

The literary equivalent of your mum coming round when you’re sad and giving you a cuddle. I adore these books, and the TV series, and as soon as my daughter is old enough to be read a book without taking it from me and stuffing the pages into her mouth, I’ll be reading her these.

Animal Ark –

These books are incredible and I’m seriously tempted to rebuy the whole series “for my daughter” and then read them all.

My Secret Unicorn – Linda Chapman

My sister had basically this entire series and they were really Not My Thing at that stage of my life (Unicorns? Could not be me) but they were oddly compelling and totally wholesome so I stole them and read them under the covers.

Animal Stories – Enid Blyton

I loved animals growing up – still do, in fact – and I loved Enid Blyton, so this was a match made in heaven. The children who lived at Green Meadowsd had SO MANY PETS and they were all SO WELL BEHAVED and it’s so WHOLESOME.

The 7 in 1 Collection – Enid Blyton

For a child this was an absolute UNIT of a book, and I loved it. The House at the Corner in particular I read again and a gain – the characters were so much Older and more Grown Up than I was and it felt so incredibly edgy to nine-year-old me.


I’ve had a look at some lists and spotted some books I’d totally forgotten about, so I’m going to be filling up a classic bookshelf for my baby. Have you read any of mine? Let me know!