Throwback Top Ten Tuesday | Childhood Favourites

I wasn’t daft on this week’s TTT prompt, so I decided to go right back to the start and relive some past topics when the current prompt didn’t inspire me!

Here are some of my favourite books as a child/very early teenager.

The “Wild at Heart” series – Laurie Halse Anderson

Laurie Halse Anderson is, famously, my favourite YA author and one of my favourite authors full stop. My aunt used to send these over from the US because I loved animals, and I devoured them. It wasn’t until years later – once I’d read LHA’s YA books – that I realised she wrote some of my childhood favourites. A lovely little realisation.

The Princess Diaries series – Meg Cabot

Easily one of my favourite book series of all time. Like I don’t even have anything else on top of that, they’re funny and even now like meeting up again with old friends.

Pig-Heart Boy – Malorie Blackman

Everyone knows Malorie Blackman for Noughts and Crosses, but the story of Cameron, who’s about to receive a heart transplant from a pig, was the well-thumbed book of hers that I read when I was younger. Definitely worth picking up if you haven’t read it yet!

Children Just Like Me – Barnabas and Anabel Kindersley

I have no idea how dated this book is by now but honestly I think everyone should be given a copy of this as a child. It’s basically a guidebook of different cultures presented by children between the ages of five and eleven (if I remember correctly). I absolutely adored reading it – the photography is brilliant and it’s great for showing kids what it’s like to grow up around the world.

The “Mates, Dates” series – Cathy Hopkins

Even though they touch on serious subjects (racism, teenage pregnancy, family illness are the few that I remember), these are just the most positive, warm and funny YA books I think I’ve ever come across. They’re on my list of old favourites to rebuy.

For a slightly more sobering point, I was desperately, desperately lonely as a teenager and craved the kind of fun and supportive friendships I read about in YA books. These filled a really bad void in my life.

The “Girls” series – Jacqueline Wilson

I remember reading these and being completely blown away that they were Jacqueline Wilson books – for late primary school/early high school me they were dark, dangerous and edgy compared to what I was used to from JW. They were my introduction to high school pressures and teenage experiences.

Almost Home – Nora Raleigh Baskin

Another gift from my aunt, this is a sweet MG novel about finding your place in a family and the wider world.

The “Animal Ark” series – Lucy Daniels

I ADORED these books. It was another series that tied together my love of animals and reading and they were so easy to read and moreish and emotional. I’m pretty sure I had the entire series and I read them again and again and again.

The Famous Five – Enid Blyton

Enid Blyton is one of those authors that I tend to cringe a little when I go to wax nostalgic about, because there are various examples of racism, xenophobia and classism in her work, but I’d be remiss if I didn’t include The Famous Five in a list of my favourite childhood books. I read them from cover to cover when I was in primary school, and actively wanted to be George.

(I’d like to thank my mum for, whether intentionally or not, keeping the particularly grim Blyton stories away from me.)

The “Nancy Drew Case Files” series – Carolyn Keene

I managed to unlock a memory from some deep recess of my brain while compiling this list. My mum produced a selection of these from the local library one week when I was ill (I think she thought they were the original Nancy Drew books, rather than Teenage Nancy Has A Boyfriend And Solves Mysteries). Literally had not thought about these for about twenty years and now I am DESPERATE to read them again.


I’m putting most of these on my TBR now, partly so I can have them for my daughter when she gets older and partly because I want to read them again. Dying to revisit my bookish youth…

Books I Can’t Wait To Read To My Daughter

I mentioned in a previous blog post that I have a baby daughter. If you follow me on literally any social media, you may have picked this up already. I am obsessed with her.

We’re big on books in my family, and as a result Edith’s already got more books than I have room for. I ordered one of those cool display things that looks like a library book rack to put up on the wall, but I’m not convinced it’s going to be enough.

I’m not too clued-up on kids books – particularly for really young kids – so I’m drawing a lot on my own memories, as well as some I’ve seen on social media in passing. This is in no way an exhaustive list, and by the time you’re reading it I’ll inevitably have found more…

The Gruffalo – Julia Donaldson

My mum used to work in a nursery before she retired and she is a huge Julia Donaldson fangirl – she’s already started buying them so Edith can have the full collection. I didn’t know there were so many! I have at least two copies of the Gruffalo that my friends with older kids have given me and we inevitably end up watching it every Christmas morning (even though my sister and I are in our mid to late 20s) so it’s going to be one of Edith’s first stories.

Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls – Elena Favilli and Francesca Cavallo

I am, and have been for some time, an Angry Woman. Before Edith was born my husband joked that every time she she was battering my organs she was practising fighting TERFs, reply-guys on the internet and other assorted wrong’uns.

Okay so some of these have aged terribly (JK Rowling, anyone?) and there are some stories I would have liked to see included (Marsha P. Johnson, for example) but on the whole they’re full of incredible stories and role models. Some of them I know shamefully little about, so it’ll be a learning experience for me too.

Both were a gift from one of my best friends just after Edith was born, and she’s kickass and strong and always beside me whenever I need her. We’re rebel girls, and I know with her help Edith will be as well.

Look Up! – Nathan Bryon

Look Up! appeared on my radar when it was awarded the Waterstones Children’s Book of the Year. I was BIG into space when I was younger and I still think it’s incredibly cool, plus I’m all for seeing girls being represented in STEM hobbies and ambitions. Definitely one I’ll be picking up on my next trip out.

Old Bear Stories – Jane Hissey

These books are basically perfect – nice, cosy, wholesome, with adorable characters. There will be books to teach my kid she can do anything, books to teach her about the world and about compassion and humility, but these are the books I’m going to read her when she needs to close the door and be safe for a while.

Plus if you follow Jane Hissey on Twitter she posts adorable illustrations of characters from the series and cute animals.

The Tiger Who Came To Tea – Judith Kerr

A classic from my childhood, and one that was beloved by the kids my mum had in the nursery. It’s just fun, it’s the right level of absurd (a tIger coming to tea and eating ALL THE FOOD IN THE HOUSE) and features the most absurdly exciting thing I could possibly have imagined as a young child: a late -night trip to a cafe for tea.

If you’ve written a children’s book in 1968 and it’s still being read to kids in 2020, I think the general consensus is that you’ve absolutely nailed it.

Hairy Maclary from Donaldson’s Dairy – Lynley Dodd

One of the criticisms I saw of this book on Goodreads was that it had “very little plot”. Honestly, who cares? It’s got funny dogs, rhymes – kids love rhymes – charming illustrations and a villain. It’s top tier.


Right now she’s too young to do much more than grab at the pages – we have a soft crinkly picture book that she LOVES – but when she’s able to sit up by herself (thus freeing up my hands for turning pages) I’m going to be reading to her whenever we have a quite few minutes.

What other books should I have on my shopping list? Let me know! I love books that focus on diversity and social issues, as well as rhymes and fun pictures.

Top Ten Tuesday | Ten Books With Colours In The Titles

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly book meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl.


As it turns out, I don’t have a lot of books with colours in the titles, so I had to work really hard. Subsequently, some of these are from my TBR, some I read a while ago, some I cheated with. Slightly.

Manatee Blues – Laurie Halse Anderson

I’ve mentioned before that Laurie Halse Anderson is my favourite YA author, so it blew my mind a few years ago when I discovered that she’d also writtenn some of my favourite MG books. As an animal obsessed, wanted-to-be-a-vet kid, my auntie used to send me these over from the US and I read them over and over again.

The Priory of the Orange Tree – Samantha Shannon

I’ve been meaning to pick this up for a while now and have shamefully never gotten round to it. You had me at dragons, but LGBTQ characters? Yes please.

The Green Mile – Stephen King

The Green Mile is one of the only movies I’ve ever cried at. The book didn’t move me quite the same, but it’s still a decent read.

Out of the Blue – Sophie Cameron

This has been on my TBR for AGES. Aside from anything else it’s set in Edinburgh, and if there’s one thing that never fails to turn my head it’s a book set in Edinburgh.

The Black Book – Ian Rankin

It took me an embarrassing amount of time to get round to reading the Rebus series, and I really wish I’d picked it up sooner. Rebus is a miserable bastard of a character but you like him anyway, and his acerbic wit is a TREAT.

The Black Book is (I think) as far as I got up to last time, but I’m rereading my way through it again. The whole series is an absolute joy regardless of whether it’s the first time you’ve read it or not.

Also, see above comment RE: books set in Edinburgh.

Children of Blood and Bone – Tomi Adeyemi

“Bone” is a colour. I will not be taking questions at this time.

I remember Book Twitter being ALL ABOUT THIS BOOK when it was first released, and I never actually got round to picking up a copy, but I heard one of my favourite Magic: the Gathering podcasters talking about it recently and it’s reminded me that I really need to get hold of a copy sooner rather than later.

Amber Brown is Not a Crayon – Paula Danziger

One I enjoyed, and one for my daughter when she grows up! If my memory serves I found a copy of this in a house we stayed in on holiday once and thoroughly enjoyed it.

Yes I was the child who immediately found the bookcase in the places we stayed when we were on holiday.

A Darker Shade of Magic – VE Schwab

Okay it sounds like it’s talking about colours. That counts, right?

Good.

I love this book. I had nearly finished reading it when the roof of my front porch – where I’d stored a lot of books while we did the nursery up – started leaking and the book got totally waterlogged.

None of my husband’s books did. Just this one that I hadn’t finished.

The Amber Spyglass – Philip Pullman

An obvious classic. I was never a Philip Pullman kid growing up and it still doesn’t vibe with me a strongly as it does for other people for some reason – my mum, on the other hand, ADORES this series – but I still thoroughly enjoyed it.

Also the editions I have are very pretty.

Dragonfly in Amber – Diana Gabaldon

The Outlander books are, in my opinion, one of the few cases where the screen adaptation absolutely outshines the book.

At least for the first two seasons.

(I enjoyed the first book well enough, but it didn’t make me want to fall over myself picking up this one, whereas I binged all the episodes on Prime in about two days and BAWLED.)


Well, we got there. On my to-do list: read more fantasy. Those seem to be the books with the colourful names.

Six For Sunday: Winter Colours

I used to really hate winter. My SAD used to go through the roof from about September onward and I have distinct memories of standing in the pouring rain one December at a crossing in my university town, feeling absolutely the most miserable I have ever felt.

Now that I’m in a better place, I really love dark, cosy evenings and the sound of the rain battering against the window. I love when the sun never really gets above the horizon

And I love the colours. Autumn is good but winter is black and gold and blue and silver. Here’s some of the books I pulled out of my bookcase that scream ICE AND COLD AND LONG DARK NIGHTS to me.

A Shiver of Snow and Sky – Lisa Lueddecke

Not only does the title scream “it’s winter, read me in the early evening twilight while the rain batters off the windows”, the cover LITERALLY has snow on it.

Six of Crows – Leigh Bardugo

I love Six of Crows. It was one of the last books I read before I completely broke away from books and reading and it’s still one of my favourites.

The Impossible Knife of Memory – Laurie Halse Anderson

Laurie Halse Anderson is my favourite YA author – she tackles tough subjects in a really sensitive way without dumbing them down or patronising her audience. TIKOM tackles PTSD in veterans and having a parent struggling with their mental health.

Persepolis – Marjane Satrapi

I can’t remember exactly who I saw raving about Persepolis on Booktube, but I found a copy in my local comic store and, after the daughter of the owner confirmed it was an excellent read I bought it. Started reading while I was pregnant, got distracted by Animal Crossing. It’s next on my TBR though…

Faerie Tale – Raymond E. Feist

My husband, although not much of a reader now, used to be a huge fantasy nerd and loved Raymond Feist. I don’t get on hugely well with high fantasy, but he assured me that Faerie Tale was more my thing. It’s been sitting in our porch since we moved into this house in 2016, but I’ve just promoted it to The Bedside Table, so I’ll get to it eventually. Cracking icy-grey cover, too.

The Riddle – Alison Croggon

Did you really think I wasn’t going to fit a Pellinor book in somewhere?


I can’t wait to see other winter picks. Not only do I need to flesh out my TBR, but I’m all about aesthetics – and I’m REALLY in the mood for summer to be over this year!

The Mystery Blogger Award!

mystery blogger award

“This is an award for amazing bloggers with indigenous posts. Their blog not only captivates; it inspires and motivates. They are one of the best out there, and they deserve every recognition they get. This award is also for bloggers who find fun and inspiration in blogging and they do it with so much love and passion.” – Okoto Enigma

I was nominated for this by Jemma @ Fantastic Books and Where To Find Them. She has a gr8 blog so go follow it nerds. Thanks Jemma! ❤

Rules

  • Put the award logo/image on your blog.
  • Mention the creator of the award and provide a link as well.
  • List the rules.
  • Thank whoever nominated you and provide a link to their blog.
  • Tell your readers 3 things about yourself.
  • Nominate 10 – 20 people.
  • Notify your nominees by commenting on their blog.
  • Ask your nominees any 5 questions of your choice, with one weird or funny question (specify).
  • Share a link to their best post(s).

Three Facts About Me

  1. I work for a company that manufactures and sells tartan fabrics and kilts.
  2. I have three scars – two from Typhoon Lagoon in Florida and one from the worst bout of sunburn I’ve ever had.
  3. Last week I held a baby for the first time ever and I was terrified. She cried. I don’t blame her.

Jemma’s Question

Which fictional world would you live in?

When I answered Kelly’s Fandom Frenzy prompt I said Hogwarts, but it’d be toss up between there and Pellinor, from Alison Croggon’s series.

If you were a fictional character and had an animal companion tell me about them, they can be a fictional creature too.

I know most people will expect me to say dragon, but I think I’d like a really clever dog. A big fluffy one. In reality I’d probably end up with a cat like my own actual cat: a bit of an idiot and totally unreliable.

What book do you wish you could read for the first time all over again?

PELLINOR.

What is your biggest bookish peeve?

Is movie tie-in covers a peeve? I think they’re U G L Y.

Where is your favourite place to be?

In my house. On the couch. With a G&T and my laptop.

I Nominate…

Malanie @ Malanie Loves Fiction
Kristina @ Books and Dachshunds
Life With All The Books
Laura @ Reading Sanctuary
Sara @ The Bibliophagist
Luna @ Bookish Luna
Asha @ A Cat, A Book and A Cup of Tea
Justine @ I Should Read That
Kate @ Reading Through Infinity
Hannah @ I Have Thoughts on Books

My questions for you

  1. Hardback or paperback?
  2. If you could have any book cover ever printed blown up into a poster for your wall, what would it be?
  3. How do you feel about sprayed edges?
  4. Do you dog ear your pages?
  5. Would you rather have a duck the size of a horse or ten horses the size of ducks?

PEACE.

Top Ten Tuesday | Fictional Worlds I’d Like To Live In

I couldn’t think of ten book worlds that I’d actually like to live in. There’s a few I’d maybe like to go on holiday to…

I stretched the definition a little to cover all fictional worlds.

Hogwarts – Harry Potter

hogwarts-2404482_960_720

Because OBVIOUSLY.

Edil-Amarandh – the Pellinor series

the singing

I mean, things weren’t always great in Edil-Amarandh but I’d LOVE to be a Bard.

Scotland – Outlander

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TECHNICALLY I’m cheating here because 18th century Scotland isn’t fictional. I’m also not entirely sure women were particularly well treated in Scotland during the clan era, although Claire never seems to complain. Regardless, even as someone who grew up in Scotland and spent time in the Highlands, I usually want to fling myself into the TV while I’m watching it.

Yorkshire – Downton Abbey

I am heavy obsessed with Downton Abbey. I have this probably romanticised view of working and living in a big posh Edwardian house that’s almost certainly because of this show. I might as well have been in this world to be honest, when the series ended I cried like I’d lost all my friends.

Kanto – Pokemon

Find me someone who grew up with Gen One Pokemon who doesn’t wish that they were real. Especially after Pokemon Go.

New York – The Great Gatsby

gggg

Also technically not a fictional world, but I can totally see myself in 1920s America drinking champagne in a swimming pool listening to jazz.

I’m not sure I can picture myself as a flapper though. Maybe if I could get away with it in jeans and Vans…

On The Road

on the road

Listening to jazz music and speaking in poetry and driving across the states with my friends sounds like an absolute dream. If I could go back ten years and get rid of my anxiety I’d drop everything and go.

Destiny

tower

Let’s face it, the world of Destiny actually sucks. Humanity is confined to one city and they’re always under the threat of attack from various space age beasties. I’d really just like to be a Guardian and be immortal, with a gun that shoots light bullets and the ability to throw fire from my hands.

The Famous Five

famous five

If you read these books as a kid and you didn’t dream of running away to a deserted island with a dog and a picnic, you have more restraint than I do. As a kid who spent a lot of the time feeling lonely, all I wanted to do was go on adventures on my bike with my friends in this wild and rolling countryside.

Skyrim

I love dragons. Everyone knows I love dragons. I’d probably end up eaten by a dragon but I want to live in a house made of stone in Whiterun and worship Talos don’t @ me.

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Who’s coming with me? Where would you go? SPEAK WITH ME.

Book Spotlight | I Was Born For This by Alice Oseman

For Angel Rahimi, life is only about one thing: The Ark – a pop-rock trio of teenage boys who are currently taking the world by storm. Being part of The Ark’s fandom has given her everything – her friendships, her dreams, her place in the world.

Jimmy Kaga-Ricci owes everything to The Ark too. He’s their frontman – and playing in a band is all he’s ever dreamed of doing. It’s just a shame that recently everything in his life seems to have turned into a bit of a nightmare.

Because that’s the problem with dreaming – eventually, inevitably, real life arrives with a wake-up call. And when Angel and Jimmy are unexpectedly thrust together, they will discover just how strange and surprising facing up to reality can be.

iwbft

I love Alice Oseman. Radio Silence and Solitaire are both books I wish I’d had when I was in high school. Instead of trying to look at them from the perspective of the current young adult audience, these books resonate with Younger Me in a big way, and it’s both heartbreaking and pretty therapeutic.

I Was Born For This is both completely different and exactly the same.

It’s the story of how pervasive and consuming pouring your heart and soul into something can be. A band, a TV show, a book…it’s an authentic look at how how important, and how destructive these things can be when they become everything. It’s also a testament to the friends and communities that build up around things can be to someone who’s lonely or struggling. It can save lives.

So why only four stars?

This didn’t resonate with me in the same way the previous two did, which is not a fault of the book. Most of my fandom adventures were solitary, borne of loneliness in school and mental illness, and I didn’t have anywhere near the experiences of Angel and Juliet. If I’d been more heavily involved? Hell yeah, I can see another version of me in this book.

Overall, not my favourite Alice Oseman book because it didn’t hit my buttons in the specific video-game-puzzle-solving order like the previous two, but still a gr8 book. Alice Oseman is one of the very best YA authors around, and I have absolutely no doubt that pretty much everyone who’s ever used the internet will see themselves in the pages.

Rating: ****

Top Ten Tuesday | Favourite Book Quotes

I’ve been out of the Top Ten Tuesday habit recently. Two and a half snow days last week has thrown my sense of time completely, so I’m currently hashing out a post on my lunch break. I only have six, because that’s all I have time for. Fight me.

…the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes “Awww!” – On The Road (Jack Kerouac)

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past. – The Great Gatsby (F. Scott Fitzgerald)

Sleep tight, ya morons! – The Catcher in the Rye (JD Salinger)

  • I was about as miserable at school as Holden Caulfield was, so I scrawled this on the back of my shirt in Sharpie on my last day. I thought I was so cool.

When people don’t express themselves, they die one piece at a time. You’d be shocked at how many adults are really dead inside—walking through their days with no idea who they are, just waiting for a heart attack or cancer or a Mack truck to come along and finish the job. It’s the saddest thing I know. – Speak (Laurie Halse Anderson)

They were a gloomy suite of rooms, in a lowering pile of building up a yard, where it had so little business to be, that one could scarcely help fancying it must have run there when it was a young house, playing at hide-and-seek with other houses, and forgotten the way out again. – A Christmas Carol (Charles Dickens)

  • This description of Scrooge’s house tickled me to death when I read the book over Christmas. I was never a big fan of the classics but some of Dickens’ lines in this were glorious.

Can I help you?” said the footman. Richard had been told to fuck off and die with more warmth and good humour. Neverwhere (Neil Gaiman)

  •  I LOVE THIS LINE. I love Neil Gaiman.

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So that was a rather hasty TTT effort. What epic quotes have I missed? How’s your Tuesday going? Will I get my finger out over the weekend and learn what day it is? Why is it so cold? Talk to me!

 

Sunshine Blogger Award!

Hooray! I was nominated for the Sunshine Blogger Award by Malanie @ Malanie Loves Fiction. Thanks Malanie! (And sorry it’s taken me approx. 78 years to do this, I’ve been dying on the couch.)

sba

Rules:

  • Thank the person who nominated you in a blog post and link back to their blog
  • Answer the 11 questions sent by the person who nominated you.
  • Nominate 11 new blogs to receive the award and write them 11 new questions.
  • List the rules and display the Sunshine Blogger Award logo on your post and/or on your blog.

Malanie’s Questions

Name the first book that comes to mind GO

Solitaire by Alice Oseman. It’s the first one in my eye level when I look up!

What’s your favorite TV show of all time?

Doctor Who. It jumped the shark in a BIG way when Stephen Moffat took over but let’s talk about series one through four for a second. Or all day. Whichever you prefer.

Who is your favorite author?

JK Rowling, Laurie Halse Anderson, Alison Croggon.

Do you read ARCs? Favorite ARC you’ve ever received?

I don’t, but I’ve signed up to Netgalley – and then promptly fell ill, so now that I feel like a human again I’m going to actually look into it.

3 book characters who are most like you

Uhhhhhh

  • Hermione Granger – likes learning stuff, spends a lot of her time exasperated with her friends, has a cat.
  • Mia in the Princess Diaries series, because she was the most relatable character I’ve ever found for high school me.
  • Steffi in A Quiet Kind of Thunder, because while I wasn’t COMPLETELY mute in school, I certainly didn’t talk an awful lot until I got to probably my final year. Anxiety, yo.

Favorite animal?

Giraffes. They’re tall and goofy looking. Relatable.

Favorite book character?

Probably Cadvan from the Pellinor series.

Which book do you wish you could forget so you could reread it for the first time again?

The Gift by Alison Croggon. Honestly by this point I’ve likely hyped it up so much that anyone else picking these books up will be like “what is this girl on”.

Favorite book as a child?

I grew up with Harry Potter. The first book came out when I was seven, so I can barely remember what my favourite was before Harry!

Book you wish would be turned into a movie or TV show

The Pellinor series by Alison Croggon…but I know that I have such high expectations that it would have to be almost unrealistically good.

Book you’re really really looking forward to in 2018

Goodbye, Perfect by Sara Barnard, Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi, On The Come Up by Angie Thomas.

My questions:

  1. What’s the best present you’ve ever received?
  2. What song are you listening to right now? (Or what was the last song you listened to?)
  3. What’s your favourite quote from a book ever?
  4. What’s the furthest you’ve ever travelled? (And what was it like!)
  5. Favourite pizza topping?
  6. What top three things do you look for in a book?
  7. What’s the first book you can ever remember reading? (Or having read to you!)
  8. What are you looking forward to most in 2018?
  9. Is there a book out just now that you haven’t read but are DYING to?
  10. If you could meet any author, dead or alive, who would it be?
  11. What made you decide to start blogging?

I nominate:

Kristina @ Books and Dachshunds

Luna @ Bookish Luna

Taylor & Missy @ Frayed Books

Charlotte @ Charlotte Somewhere

Heidi @ This Is My Bookshelf

Golden Books Girl

Amy @ Tomes with Tea

Sarah @ Sarah Withers Blogs

Lauren @ Northern Plunder

Nadia @ Headscarves and Hardbacks

Liz @ Travel in Retrospect

Top Ten Tuesday: Books That Have Been On My TBR the Longest and I Still Haven’t Read

I feel like I’ve mentioned most of these before, which gives you some idea of how miserably extensive my TBR list is. Maybe I’ll get so sick of myself that I’ll do something about it. Advance!

Wing Jones – Katherine Webb

wing jones

The fact that I’m putting this on a TBR list AGAIN brings me skin-crawling shame. I’ve had this since the Edinburgh Book Festival last year and its sprayed edges keep looking at me from the cabinet in the living room. Once I’ve read The Fandom, Wing Jones. I promise.

Six of Crows – Leigh Bardugo

six of crows

Bought Six of Crows before going to Florida last year, got about five pages in on the red eye flight home and fell asleep after a gin and a dose of Kalms. I will read it again without any of these factors in the mix and hopefully stay conscious.

The Sun is Also a Star – Nicola Yoon

Yoon_9780553496680_jkt_all_r1.indd

This is one of my two longest-standing TBR books. I picked this up with Orangeboy and The Hate U Give, read THUG and then never quite got round to starting the other two. Oops.

Orangeboy – Patrice Lawrence

orangeboy

See above.

Les Miserables – Victor Hugo AND The Complete Fiction of HP Lovecraft

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Look at the cover of that Lovecraft anthology. Every time I pick it up to read it I end up staring at it instead.

Sean bought me that glorious hardback edition of Les Mis for a birthday present after he saw me eyeing it up. This means it looks really pretty in the bookcase, where it’s been sitting ever since. Multiple people have told me it’s even more of an experience than the musical, so I really have no excuse.

Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte

wuthering heights

I always felt like a horrible English student because I couldn’t stand the “classics”. I found them chronically dry, far too wordy and very difficult to read. In my old age (ha) I’m finding that I too am chronically dry, far too wordy and very difficult to read, and therefore I’m more inclined to give them another go.

Doctor Sax – Jack Kerouac

doctor sax

I don’t even remember buying this, but I loved On The Road (see last week’s TTT) so I’m assuming that was my motivation. Kerouac is one of my favourite writers, so I know this is going to be good…I just wish I didn’t keep forgetting I actually own it.

Tender Is The Night – F. Scott Fitzgerald

tender is the night

Similarly, I’m fairly sure I bought this because I loved The Great Gatsby, but have not read.

I must stop doing this.

 

Am I Normal Yet? – Holly Bourne

am i normal yet

I’ve never read any Holly Bourne books. Grab your pitchforks. Then chase me into a shop and force me to buy it without being distracted by notebooks and shiny covers. Thanks!

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Is there a support group for people like me? Cause I think I need one.