Top Ten Tuesday | Books I Loved But Never Reviewed

The plus side of being an absentee book blogger means that I have a list. The downside of being an absentee reader means there’s only nine I read recently that are on it. Here’s my top nine:

Mary’s The Name – Ross Sayers

I loved Mary’s the Name. Told from the perspective of eight year old Mary Sutherland, it’s sweet, funny and emotional all in one go. Ross Sayers has done an absolute belter of a job with the writing – the dramatic irony created by an eight year old narrator is brilliant, and the voice never falters.

Fault Lines – Douglas Johnstone

A thriller set in what’s basically AU contemporary Edinburgh, Fault Lines‘ protagonist is a volcanologist who discovers the body of her married lover who also happens to be her boss. Then the text messages start…

Bone Deep – Sandra Ireland

Sandra is a Creative Writing MLitt cohort of mine. I loved her first thriller Beneath the Skin, and Bone Deep didn’t disappoint either – I had to scrape my jaw off the floor at the end.

Editing Emma – Chloe Seagar

It’s rare that a book actually sends me into fits of giggles (I can appreciate when something is funny when I’m reading, but rarely do I actively laugh) but Editing Emma managed it. I’m well overdue a reread.

Hings – Chris McQueer

“Limmy meets Irvine Welsh” is just about right. Surreal and full of black Scottish humour, it’s almost like The Fast Show on acid and set in Glasgow. Love it.

A Quiet Kind of Thunder – Sara Barnard

I will wax lyrical about Sara Barnard’s books every chance I get. She does contemporary YA so well, with relatable characters that I recognise from my school days, never mind now. As someone who struggled with anxiety and talking to people when I was in school, AQKOT broke my heart.

Blackbird – ND Gomes

Contemporary YA mystery Blackbird first came to my attention when someone pointed it out it was set in Orkney, and we all know I love a Scottish book. I felt a little let down by the ending, but I enjoyed the journey!

102 Minutes: The Untold Story of the Fight to Survive Inside the Twin Towers

This is, unsurprisingly, incredibly heavy and emotional reading. I knew the outcome – as everyone will – but . Harrowing, but definitely worth it.

Radio Silence – Alice Oseman

Radio Silence is top tier YA. It’s the book I wish I’d had when I was a teenager. I don’t even want to say any more in case anyone hasn’t read it yet. You absolutely should.

(Fun fact: this is the book that got me back into being bookish, and it’s because I suddenly though that “Radio Silence” would be a great book title so I googled it and found UKYA Twitter. I’m glad I did.)

Top Ten Tuesday | Ten Books With Colours In The Titles

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly book meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl.


As it turns out, I don’t have a lot of books with colours in the titles, so I had to work really hard. Subsequently, some of these are from my TBR, some I read a while ago, some I cheated with. Slightly.

Manatee Blues – Laurie Halse Anderson

I’ve mentioned before that Laurie Halse Anderson is my favourite YA author, so it blew my mind a few years ago when I discovered that she’d also writtenn some of my favourite MG books. As an animal obsessed, wanted-to-be-a-vet kid, my auntie used to send me these over from the US and I read them over and over again.

The Priory of the Orange Tree – Samantha Shannon

I’ve been meaning to pick this up for a while now and have shamefully never gotten round to it. You had me at dragons, but LGBTQ characters? Yes please.

The Green Mile – Stephen King

The Green Mile is one of the only movies I’ve ever cried at. The book didn’t move me quite the same, but it’s still a decent read.

Out of the Blue – Sophie Cameron

This has been on my TBR for AGES. Aside from anything else it’s set in Edinburgh, and if there’s one thing that never fails to turn my head it’s a book set in Edinburgh.

The Black Book – Ian Rankin

It took me an embarrassing amount of time to get round to reading the Rebus series, and I really wish I’d picked it up sooner. Rebus is a miserable bastard of a character but you like him anyway, and his acerbic wit is a TREAT.

The Black Book is (I think) as far as I got up to last time, but I’m rereading my way through it again. The whole series is an absolute joy regardless of whether it’s the first time you’ve read it or not.

Also, see above comment RE: books set in Edinburgh.

Children of Blood and Bone – Tomi Adeyemi

“Bone” is a colour. I will not be taking questions at this time.

I remember Book Twitter being ALL ABOUT THIS BOOK when it was first released, and I never actually got round to picking up a copy, but I heard one of my favourite Magic: the Gathering podcasters talking about it recently and it’s reminded me that I really need to get hold of a copy sooner rather than later.

Amber Brown is Not a Crayon – Paula Danziger

One I enjoyed, and one for my daughter when she grows up! If my memory serves I found a copy of this in a house we stayed in on holiday once and thoroughly enjoyed it.

Yes I was the child who immediately found the bookcase in the places we stayed when we were on holiday.

A Darker Shade of Magic – VE Schwab

Okay it sounds like it’s talking about colours. That counts, right?

Good.

I love this book. I had nearly finished reading it when the roof of my front porch – where I’d stored a lot of books while we did the nursery up – started leaking and the book got totally waterlogged.

None of my husband’s books did. Just this one that I hadn’t finished.

The Amber Spyglass – Philip Pullman

An obvious classic. I was never a Philip Pullman kid growing up and it still doesn’t vibe with me a strongly as it does for other people for some reason – my mum, on the other hand, ADORES this series – but I still thoroughly enjoyed it.

Also the editions I have are very pretty.

Dragonfly in Amber – Diana Gabaldon

The Outlander books are, in my opinion, one of the few cases where the screen adaptation absolutely outshines the book.

At least for the first two seasons.

(I enjoyed the first book well enough, but it didn’t make me want to fall over myself picking up this one, whereas I binged all the episodes on Prime in about two days and BAWLED.)


Well, we got there. On my to-do list: read more fantasy. Those seem to be the books with the colourful names.

Top Ten Tuesday: Books for when I’m sick of reading.

Nobody’s ever sick of reading, really, but the term “reading slump” makes my teeth grind involuntarily so…

Anyway, as I’ve spent god knows how many weeks now reading nothing but fanfiction, this seems appropriate. If you’re also a victim of this particular pit, my sympathies.

Since I’m rusty I’ve only done five books that I can pick up to get back into the game. I suggest reading it twice.

Knots and Crosses – Ian Rankin

knots and crosses

I can’t remember the last time I became so heavily invested in a series and a character. The only thing stopping me from reading this again right now is that there’s a whole series of them I haven’t read.

It definitely helps that the books are set in Edinburgh. As someone who works in the city I love trundling past places I’ve read about

Six of Crows – Leigh Bardugo

six of crows

This is the most deliciously dark and all-consuming and evocative story I’ve read for a long time. Leigh Bardugo has created such a grubby yet gorgeous universe and set of characters.

The Disaster Artist 

the disaster artist

I’ve read this account of the filming of cult movie sensation The Room several times, and it’s still one of the few books that makes me actually wheeze with laughter. Knowledge of the movie isn’t necessary but strongly recommended.

Additionally, if you haven’t seen The Room, I’d thoroughly recommend gathering some of your closest friends and watching it. It’s the only time in my adult life I’ve come close to peeing myself.

Speak – Laurie Halse Anderson

Speak

Laurie Halse Anderson is my ride or die. She’s my idol. Speak is a book that not only shuts me up for at least a day, but it also reinforces my belief that YA is the most vital of all genres.

The Pellinor Series – Alison Croggon

the singing

Everyone’s heard me screaming about this series by now, but I love it so much and it’s my go-to when I really can’t be arsed reading anything else. I always have time for Maerad and Cadvan.

On the Road – Jack Kerouac

on the road

Jack Kerouac typed the manuscript for On the Road on a single, continuous piece of paper. In three weeks. Goals.

Because of this, the language feels like it’s dropped straight out of Kerouac’s brain into the pages, and it’s so authentic and glorious that every time I read it I feel completely alive with how great writing can be. Hugely pretentious sounding, but true.

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What other books are good for when I hit the wall? GO.

Top Ten Tuesday | My Ten Favourite Words

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Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl.

I already sort of did a summer TBR post, so I went back into the archives and pulled a random topic. Here are ten of my favourite Scottish words.

Well, okay, there’s eight and one that isn’t a Scottish word.

Haar

A Scottish word I only recently learned when my mum pointed it out on the Forth. It refers, according to the Edinburgh Evening News, “specifically to the coastal fog which typically forms in Spring and Summer over eastern Scotland and England.” So there you go.

haar
Its haar, not fog. I mean, it is fog, but it’s haar. Ya ken?

Drumnadrochit

This is a place name rather than a word, but my god it’s fun to say, isn’t it?

How?

Not a Scottish word, you might say. Well, you’re right, but I’m not sure anywhere else has swapped it for the word “why” over time. It didn’t ever occur to me that we do this until it was pointed out by a few baffled non-Scots. It’s probably my favourite cute little quirk of language.

Crabbit

As a self-professed miserable cow, I use this one quite a lot. Incidentally, it was also one of the first colloquialisms we taught my friend Tackle before he came to visit. An excellent descriptor.

Shoogle

Roughly translates to “wobble” (“that chair’s a bit shoogly”) but can also mean to shake something. Giving someone a shoogle means to swing them around in a manner that may induce motion sickness.

Shan

In Edinburgh, “Barry” and “Shan” are used to mean “good” and “bad” respectively. I think shan is a brilliant word, which is just as well as since I started working in Morningside I’ve found myself picking it up from my colleagues. Definitely not shan.

Ken

I really want to know if anyone’s ever come away from a conversation with a Scottish person wondering who Ken is, and why he’s so popular. It means “know”. Ya ken?

Dreich

This is a good one to learn if you ever come to Scotland. It’s used to describe miserable weather, and as we have a fair few dreich days in all seasons,

And one that isn’t Scottish…

Bleach

This might be my favourite word and I have absolutely no justification for it. I just love the way it sounds.

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Gimme your favourite words in your local dialect. I love them.

Top Ten Tuesday | Fictional Worlds I’d Like To Live In

I couldn’t think of ten book worlds that I’d actually like to live in. There’s a few I’d maybe like to go on holiday to…

I stretched the definition a little to cover all fictional worlds.

Hogwarts – Harry Potter

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Because OBVIOUSLY.

Edil-Amarandh – the Pellinor series

the singing

I mean, things weren’t always great in Edil-Amarandh but I’d LOVE to be a Bard.

Scotland – Outlander

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TECHNICALLY I’m cheating here because 18th century Scotland isn’t fictional. I’m also not entirely sure women were particularly well treated in Scotland during the clan era, although Claire never seems to complain. Regardless, even as someone who grew up in Scotland and spent time in the Highlands, I usually want to fling myself into the TV while I’m watching it.

Yorkshire – Downton Abbey

I am heavy obsessed with Downton Abbey. I have this probably romanticised view of working and living in a big posh Edwardian house that’s almost certainly because of this show. I might as well have been in this world to be honest, when the series ended I cried like I’d lost all my friends.

Kanto – Pokemon

Find me someone who grew up with Gen One Pokemon who doesn’t wish that they were real. Especially after Pokemon Go.

New York – The Great Gatsby

gggg

Also technically not a fictional world, but I can totally see myself in 1920s America drinking champagne in a swimming pool listening to jazz.

I’m not sure I can picture myself as a flapper though. Maybe if I could get away with it in jeans and Vans…

On The Road

on the road

Listening to jazz music and speaking in poetry and driving across the states with my friends sounds like an absolute dream. If I could go back ten years and get rid of my anxiety I’d drop everything and go.

Destiny

tower

Let’s face it, the world of Destiny actually sucks. Humanity is confined to one city and they’re always under the threat of attack from various space age beasties. I’d really just like to be a Guardian and be immortal, with a gun that shoots light bullets and the ability to throw fire from my hands.

The Famous Five

famous five

If you read these books as a kid and you didn’t dream of running away to a deserted island with a dog and a picnic, you have more restraint than I do. As a kid who spent a lot of the time feeling lonely, all I wanted to do was go on adventures on my bike with my friends in this wild and rolling countryside.

Skyrim

I love dragons. Everyone knows I love dragons. I’d probably end up eaten by a dragon but I want to live in a house made of stone in Whiterun and worship Talos don’t @ me.

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Who’s coming with me? Where would you go? SPEAK WITH ME.

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books My Mum Owns That I’m Totally Stealing

My mum likes books. She’s at least partly to blame for the way I am. The benefit of this is that it means I can use my parents’ house like a library, and everything she owns I like to think I can claim part-ownership of. It works both ways, but she has more room for books than I do, so…

With this in mind, here’s ten books that I’ve used this privilege to either steal or reserve.

Lion by Saroo Brierly

lion

You can read my Book Spotlight post about this book here. Spoiler alert: I loved it.

All The Light We Cannot See – Anthony Doerr

all the light

I finished reading this yesterday, after several days of nearly missing my stop on the train on the way home from work. ATLWCS switches between the two characters and two points in the war without ever being disconcerting or confusing, and it’s so heart-wrenchingly pure, underscored by the awfulness of the war. It doesn’t have a word out of place. Beautiful book.

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine – Gail Honeyman

eleanor oliphant

You can read what I thought of Eleanor Oliphant here.

Knots and Crosses – Ian Rankin

knots and crosses

Few things bring me shame quite like the fact that I’ve never read an Ian Rankin book. He was born 15 miles from where I live, for god sake! My fiance bumped into him coming out of Tesco in Edinburgh! Maw, please shove this book into my grubby hand next time I come round.

Never Let Me Go

never let me go

I mentioned this in last week’s TTT post. I picked it up thinking “Huh, I’ve heard so many people talk about this book, I might as well read it” and then realised very quickly that I HAD at some point read it, but I had retained absolutely nothing except the bare minimum, enough for the whole experience to be entirely deja-vu. Another surreal layer to a surreal book.

Northern Lights – Phillip Pullman

northern lights

My friend Roisin had the 10/10 idea of starting a book club for the MtG UKISA judge community and this is the first book we’re reading. I am delighted, since I haven’t read any of the His Dark Materials series.

Yes, you read that correctly. Please do not cast me out into the darkness.

This is what I’m currently reading, and I understand than the book is much better than the film (Golden Compass remains one of the most disappointing cinema experiences I have ever had)

The Snow Child

snow child

I swear down every time I drift towards the bookshelves my mum as good as breaks into song over how much she loves this book. I feel like I’m morally obligated to read it, if only to stop her gently weeping every time I admit I haven’t yet.

I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

caged bird

I’m sure I read this years ago, but I remember nothing of it.

Sunset Song – Lewis Grassic Gibbon

sunset song

I’m on a binge of anything Scottish at the moment, half inspired by my job and half by Outlander. My mum’s owned XXXX Scot’s Quair for about as long as I can remember and she’s been telling me it’s gorgeous for as long as I can remember, but Scottish history was so cripplingly dull in school (WHY did they do that, what an injustice) that I never fancied it. Now that I’m in the mindset to read it I’m going to pinch it.

The Cider House Rules – John Irvine

cider house

I’ve been meaning to read this for years. ONE DAY MOTHER. ONE DAY.

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Have you read these? Should I break down the door to my parents’ house right now? TELL ME.

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Loved but Will Never Re-Read

“Loved” isn’t the right word. If I really loved a book I won’t have an issue re-reading it. Here’s ten books that I enjoyed well enough but wouldn’t be upset if they went missing.

Wuthering Heights

wuthering

I didn’t dislike Wuthering Heights. I was expecting more gothic-horror-ness than I got out of it, I found the characters so distinctly unlikeable there were only two I liked (fortunately one of them was the primary narrator) and I couldn’t make myself even slightly care about what happened to them. I really must look up some analysis of it because I’m sure I’m being dense about what it all MEANS but for now, I remain underwhelmed.

Game of Thrones

game of thrones

I’ve read the first book twice, made it to halfway through the second and admitted defeat. Will I go back to it? Probably. High fantasy isn’t usually my jam, but I’m discovering a slight taste for it. Will I read the first book again? Unlikely. Twice was quite enough, thanks. Plus I’ve seen the first series of the TV show. I know the story.

Never Let Me Go

never let me go

I loved this book, but reading it was a very bizarre experience. Not just because it’s got a pretty effed up plot hiding behind the beautiful writing, but because I am ninety-nine percent sure I have read this book twice now. I couldn’t have told you what happened or what was going to happen during the last read-through, but the sense of déjà vu that came with me as I read it was so pervasive that it made the book very surreal.

At least this time I can remember that I’ve read it.

Fangirl

Fangirl

I really liked Fangirl. Anxiety and struggling to find your place in the world at university? Hello. But it was long, and if I’m ever going to read a long book again, it needs to batter me round the head and leave me lodged in between worlds until I don’t know which way is up. As much as I enjoyed it, Fangirl didn’t. Sorry, Rainbow Rowell fans. Please don’t egg my house.

Blackbird

blackbird

I bought Blackbird purely on the fact that it’s based in Scotland (Orkney) and I am absolute trash for anything set in Scotland. It was enjoyable enough, but I was expecting more mystery than I ended up getting, and the setting wasn’t enough to catapult me there and keep me.

The Fandom

the fandom

One of the most hyped books I’ve seen in the UKYA sphere. It wasn’t a bad book, but it a) had had its flames fanned so much that it couldn’t help but fall a bit flat, and b) wasn’t at all what I was expecting. I find myself turned off more and more by dystopian-future books, and that was what the Fandom turned out to be for me, above all else.

The Hunger Games

hunger games

Ditto. Although I promised Sean I’d read them again because he says the second one is incredible and I’ve only read the first, so this might be cheating.

The Loneliest Girl in the Universe

loneliest girl

TLGITU is another case study for not going on the internet, ever. All I heard about before I read it (which, in fairness, took me a long time after I first noticed it and then bought it) was about how SHOCKING the TWIST was, and when you’re reading a book and you know a twist is coming, you inadvertently turn into Poirot. Now that I’ve read it all the way through, I think the impact will probably be even less.

The Cursed Child

cursed child

Yes, I didn’t hate this the first time I read it. But I think my brain has rejected it as canon, because I can’t remember much about it. Maybe it’s an absolute belter on the stage, but I remain unconvinced, and I can’t work up the motivation now to have another go.

The Square Root of Summer

square root summer

Enjoyable enough. It’s a holiday book: would read it on the plane, but I’m not going to start climbing the walls raving about it. Not for me.

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What’s on your list? What sort of burglars are robbing my house and taking ten specific books? Weigh in!

Top Ten Tuesday | Favourite Book Quotes

I’ve been out of the Top Ten Tuesday habit recently. Two and a half snow days last week has thrown my sense of time completely, so I’m currently hashing out a post on my lunch break. I only have six, because that’s all I have time for. Fight me.

…the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes “Awww!” – On The Road (Jack Kerouac)

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past. – The Great Gatsby (F. Scott Fitzgerald)

Sleep tight, ya morons! – The Catcher in the Rye (JD Salinger)

  • I was about as miserable at school as Holden Caulfield was, so I scrawled this on the back of my shirt in Sharpie on my last day. I thought I was so cool.

When people don’t express themselves, they die one piece at a time. You’d be shocked at how many adults are really dead inside—walking through their days with no idea who they are, just waiting for a heart attack or cancer or a Mack truck to come along and finish the job. It’s the saddest thing I know. – Speak (Laurie Halse Anderson)

They were a gloomy suite of rooms, in a lowering pile of building up a yard, where it had so little business to be, that one could scarcely help fancying it must have run there when it was a young house, playing at hide-and-seek with other houses, and forgotten the way out again. – A Christmas Carol (Charles Dickens)

  • This description of Scrooge’s house tickled me to death when I read the book over Christmas. I was never a big fan of the classics but some of Dickens’ lines in this were glorious.

Can I help you?” said the footman. Richard had been told to fuck off and die with more warmth and good humour. Neverwhere (Neil Gaiman)

  •  I LOVE THIS LINE. I love Neil Gaiman.

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So that was a rather hasty TTT effort. What epic quotes have I missed? How’s your Tuesday going? Will I get my finger out over the weekend and learn what day it is? Why is it so cold? Talk to me!

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Love Freebie!

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday is on the theme of “love”, with no restrictions…so for fun I thought I’d find someone I loved and get ten books THEY loved. As Sean and I had a weekend in Derby where he was unable to escape my wheedling, I took the opportunity to make him my special guest.

me and sean

I bent the rules a little and let him pick full series instead of a books in some cases, because he was angsting about it and let’s face it – we all know that pain.

This, therefore, is Sean’s Top Ten Tuesday – his favourite books (or book series) of all time.

White Wolf – David Gemmell

white wolf

“I was recommended both White Wolf and Legend by David Gemmell by a friend at university – whilst both are brilliant, the character of Skilgannon reminded me a lot of Drizzt Do’Urden from Baldur’s Gate, one of my favourite games I played as a kid. The quality of the character development of Skillgannon from start to finish is amazing, and I would recommend picking it up if you haven’t yet.”

Legend – David Gemmell

legend

“While I grew to prefer Skilgannon as a character (compared to Druss in this book), Legend is still a brilliant book with one of the best battle scenes I have ever read.”

The Empire Trilogy – Raymond E. Feist & Janny Wurts

feist

“Feist is probably more well known for the Riftwar Saga book Magician than this duet with Wurts. The depth of the individual characters and the world’s political atmosphere is something very akin to Game of Thrones and having a female protagonist is awesome. The experiences Mara goes through from book to book gripped me and I already want to go back and experience them again.”

Gameplayers – Stephen Bowkett

gameplayers 2

(This is the book that I tracked down and bought for Sean for Christmas – find out more about that here! – Kirsty)

“Out of all of the books on the list, Gameplayers is probably the least technically well written – but it still appeals to me, pure because of the nostalgia. I first read the book when I was around the same age as the characters and found myself going through lots of similar experiences that John went through. It also led me to loving RPG games and trying to play Dungeons & Dragons with people when I could. I’m still trying to D&D today!”

Riftwar Saga – Raymond E. Feist

magician

“My grandad Adrian knows of my love of high fantasy and one night in 2005, while my family were visiting, he asked if I had read Raymond E Feist’s Magician. I said no, and that weekend we went out and I got a copy. Before I had travelled home, I had read the entire book, and already bought Silverthorn and A Darkness at Sethanon on Amazon. From there I was hooked on Feist. Whilst Kirsty has issues getting into High Fantasy, i love losing myself in 6 pages picturing the fjord around me.”

(This is one of my biggest bugbears with high fantasy – yes I’m sure that’s a pretty hill and you’ve described it wonderfully and I know that the setting in a lot of stories is a character in its own right but come on.)

The Two Towers – JRR Tolkien

the two towers

“I’ve always favoured the Two Towers in the Lord of the Rings trilogy. The Events of Helms Deep and since the first book is primarily two chapters of Tom Bombadil and lots of character development and Frodo whining, i found it to be the perfect balance of building up to the events of the third book and having enough context to keep me gripped.”

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban – JK Rowling

azkaban

“It’s time to admit it, Sirius Black is a man-crush i had throughout Prisoner of Azkaban similar to those man-crushes people supposedly had on Keifer Sutherland when he did 24. Things just kicked off straight from the start in this book, and its always been my favourite in the series.”

Talon of the Silverhawk – Raymond E. Feist

silverhawk

“Talon of the Silverhawk was the final Feist book I really enjoyed – I finished the full Conclave of Shadows saga, but as I got through each book I started to find them harder to read. There are three books that Feist wrote that I’d love to see as a film or series and those are the three in this list. Talon was just sufficiently distancing from the ever present story surrounding Pug and I enjoyed the aspect of how Talon grows from the start of the book.”

The Hunger Games trilogy

hunger games

“The first non-High Fantasy book/series on this list! i picked them up before I had a long weekend from work, and by the time I had to go back all three books were finished. Out of the three, the second book was my favourite. The games like a clock was just such a cool system that I have to give a nod to it.”

The Goosebumps series

goosebumps

“The Goosebumps books my brother’s, but I read them all as I grew up. They are aimed at young teens, so obviously the writing style is focused at that, and they aren’t the type of book I’d be looking to go back and read now as i’m in my mid 20’s (mumble mumble…. 29) but I wanted to capture my full reading history on this list. These were essentially an introduction to reading for me, and they mean a lot to me.

SEAN’S HONOURABLE MENTIONS

Narnia – C.S Lewis

Death of a Salesman – Arthur Miller

Romance of the Three Kingdoms – Luo Guanzhong

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In case it’s not obvious, I’m marrying a big fantasy nerd. Thanks Sean!

Top Ten Tuesday: Books That Have Been On My TBR the Longest and I Still Haven’t Read

I feel like I’ve mentioned most of these before, which gives you some idea of how miserably extensive my TBR list is. Maybe I’ll get so sick of myself that I’ll do something about it. Advance!

Wing Jones – Katherine Webb

wing jones

The fact that I’m putting this on a TBR list AGAIN brings me skin-crawling shame. I’ve had this since the Edinburgh Book Festival last year and its sprayed edges keep looking at me from the cabinet in the living room. Once I’ve read The Fandom, Wing Jones. I promise.

Six of Crows – Leigh Bardugo

six of crows

Bought Six of Crows before going to Florida last year, got about five pages in on the red eye flight home and fell asleep after a gin and a dose of Kalms. I will read it again without any of these factors in the mix and hopefully stay conscious.

The Sun is Also a Star – Nicola Yoon

Yoon_9780553496680_jkt_all_r1.indd

This is one of my two longest-standing TBR books. I picked this up with Orangeboy and The Hate U Give, read THUG and then never quite got round to starting the other two. Oops.

Orangeboy – Patrice Lawrence

orangeboy

See above.

Les Miserables – Victor Hugo AND The Complete Fiction of HP Lovecraft

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Look at the cover of that Lovecraft anthology. Every time I pick it up to read it I end up staring at it instead.

Sean bought me that glorious hardback edition of Les Mis for a birthday present after he saw me eyeing it up. This means it looks really pretty in the bookcase, where it’s been sitting ever since. Multiple people have told me it’s even more of an experience than the musical, so I really have no excuse.

Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte

wuthering heights

I always felt like a horrible English student because I couldn’t stand the “classics”. I found them chronically dry, far too wordy and very difficult to read. In my old age (ha) I’m finding that I too am chronically dry, far too wordy and very difficult to read, and therefore I’m more inclined to give them another go.

Doctor Sax – Jack Kerouac

doctor sax

I don’t even remember buying this, but I loved On The Road (see last week’s TTT) so I’m assuming that was my motivation. Kerouac is one of my favourite writers, so I know this is going to be good…I just wish I didn’t keep forgetting I actually own it.

Tender Is The Night – F. Scott Fitzgerald

tender is the night

Similarly, I’m fairly sure I bought this because I loved The Great Gatsby, but have not read.

I must stop doing this.

 

Am I Normal Yet? – Holly Bourne

am i normal yet

I’ve never read any Holly Bourne books. Grab your pitchforks. Then chase me into a shop and force me to buy it without being distracted by notebooks and shiny covers. Thanks!

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Is there a support group for people like me? Cause I think I need one.